Hay fever relief

I’ve been taking nettles leaf capsules for over 20 years to deal with my allergies to dust and pollen. My wife and daughter use it too. All of my dubious friends who try it also become true believers. I buy the 100-capsule bottles of Nature’s Way and take 4-6 every few hours during allergy season. — MF

HealthClaudia Dawson
Good small first aid kit

This first aid kit comes in a small bag, but it’s loaded with stuff. Besides the usual bandages and sterile gauze pads, it comes with sting relief pads, an instant cold pack, a light stick, a poncho and blanket, splinter tweezers, a compass, a whistle, and a lot more. At $11, it’s a great deal. — MF

HealthClaudia Dawson
Home blood type test

My 15-year-old daughter learned about blood types in school and was curious to learn her blood type. I ordered two of these kits (each $12 kit has two tests) so our whole family could find out what our blood types are. The included auto-lance makes it easy to draw blood (it hurts just a little, not much) and it was interesting to see how our blood types clotted differently. — MF

HealthClaudia Dawson
Mini pharmacy

I travel with a mini-pharmacy in my day pack, particularly overseas. I use inexpensive pill organizers to hold common non-prescription remedies. These small plastic strips are sold as “7-day” containers for folks who need to take multiple pills per pay, but I put just a few doses of different medicines in each slot. I carry remedies for semi-emergencies like motion sickness, allergies, colds, diarrhea, pain, sleep aid, coughing, upset stomach, etc. I stick a tiny label on each compartment with the name and dosage, which is enough. I restock the few doses before each trip. Off-the-shelf medicines are not rare abroad, but language and branding differences often make it a chore to secure them. Using these light and compact containers I (and traveling companions) have access to a wide range of immediate treatments. — KK

HealthClaudia Dawson